TIMBERFRAMING 101
Timberframing 101:

The Art of joining timbers in such  a way, in which no steel fasteners are necessary. Mortise and tenon joinery is much like dovetail joints, in that the pieces involved fit together tightly and securely, making the connection last generations.

Timberframing lingo can be hard to understand and confusing to many who aren't familiar with it's fundamentals. Here are some descriptions of the basic timberframe concepts.
Mortise and Tenon:
The basic concept of the mortise and tenon, is the joining of two timbers with a wood joint, fastened with an oak peg. Figure 1 Shows a connecting Girter Beam, (with a tenon), ready to fit a post containing a mortise; peg holes in the post are pre drilled, once the joint is together the tenon holes are drilled and the pegs are installed. Figure 2 Shows a through-tenon joint after installation is complete.
FIGURE   1
FIGURE 2
Types of Joinery




Post and Foundation Sill Plate
Rafter, Post and Wall Plate
Timberframe Construction:
Joinery is only the beginning to timberframing, putting the joints together, to form walls(Bents), is how the whole structure begins to take shape. Throughout history carpenters have developed bent styles that are best for timberframing. Example B shows the basic elements that construct a simple bent
Scarf Plate Joint
Example B
Example C  shows a more complex bent style, when used, it can support more weight and wind load and is also more ornamentally designed.
Example C
Example E shows a bent style where longer spans and larger structures are made possible. Combine Example C and Example E and the bent style created would far exceed the standards and longevity of Conventionally  built homes.
Example E
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All pictures copyright 1980 James Gruber and Tedd Benson, "Building the Timberframe House"